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Naomi Roht-Arriaza on Measures of Non-Repetition After Atrocity Crimes

Published on: Author: Chimene Keitner

Distinguished Professor Naomi Roht-Arriaza, author of the pathbreaking monograph The Pinochet Effect: Transitional Justice in the Age of Human Rights and a recently appointed amicus curiae for the Special Jurisdiction for Peace in Colombia, examines the question of Measures of Non-Repetition in Transitional Justice: The Missing Link? in a forthcoming book chapter. The chapter begins… Continue reading

Jodi Short on Globalization, American Firms, and Human Rights

Published on: Author: Jared Ellias

Globalization brings tremendous benefits to developed countries, but it also creates ethical dilemmas. For example, American firms can often reduce their production costs by purchasing inputs from foreign suppliers. Problematically, the comparative advantage of some foreign suppliers might be their ability to avoid the costs associated with protecting their workers from injuries and protecting the… Continue reading

Jaime King et al. on Freestanding Emergency Departments and the Healthcare Game

Published on: Author: Emily Murphy

The fragmented nature of the U.S. healthcare system creates many targets for criticism. Innovations such as freestanding emergency departments (EDs) have recently drawn fire from payers, policy makers, and professional organizations. In a new article in the Annals of Emergency Medicine titled “Don’t Hate the Player; Hate the Game,” Professor Jaime King (writing with physician… Continue reading

Rick Marcus on the Future of the American Class Action

Published on: Author: Scott Dodson

My colleague Rick Marcus, one of the current “greats” in the world of civil procedure, recently wrote a paper called “Bending in the Breeze: American Class Actions in the Twenty-First Century.” In the paper, Professor Marcus appraises the future of the federal class action.   Professor Marcus is in a good position to do so; he… Continue reading

Jared Ellias on Bankruptcy Forum Shopping

Published on: Author: Jodi Short

What drives forum-shopping? Is it that sophisticated litigants seek jurisdictions that offer judicial expertise and predictable application of the law, or is it that sophisticated litigants seek to game the system by seeking out judges more likely to be biased in their favor? In “What Drives Bankruptcy Forum Shopping? Evidence from Market Data,” Professor Jared… Continue reading

Veena Dubal on Employee Status in the Gig Economy

Published on: Author: Joan Williams

I have been thinking a lot about my brilliant colleague Veena Dubal’s work on the underbelly of the gig economy or (as Dubal prefers to call it) the precariat. Professor Dubal’s two articles, Wage Slave or Entrepreneur? and The Drive to Precarity combine sophisticated doctrinal analysis with deep ethnographic research to raise some big questions… Continue reading

Joan Williams on Building Interracial Economic Justice

Published on: Author: Veena Dubal

“How could this have happened?” Every day, for the past 200 days or so, I have heard a friend, colleague, or acquaintance mutter some version of this question. As many of us continue to grieve the election of Donald Trump, we ask—rhetorically—why our fellow Americans thought this man was fit to be president. What “we”… Continue reading

John Crawford on Post-Recession Financial Reform

Published on: Author: Abe Cable

We’re closing in on a decade since the height of the financial crisis, so perhaps it’s not surprising that reflection on financial regulation is in the air. Much of the focus has been on two divergent ideas. On the one hand, President Trump evidenced a deregulatory approach when he famously announced he would “do a… Continue reading

Abe Cable on Stock Options at Unicorn Start-Ups

Published on: Author: John Crawford

A “unicorn” in Silicon Valley lingo is a private company that has achieved a valuation of $1 billion or more. During the first dot-com craze in the late 1990s, such creatures were truly imaginary, as companies rushed to go public in the relatively early stages of growth. More recently, unicorns have become startlingly common, as… Continue reading