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Scott Dodson on Accountability and Transparency in U.S. Courts

Published on: Author: Rick Marcus

My colleague Scott Dodson is the most prominent American civil-procedure scholar of his generation addressing comparative-procedure issues. One recognition of his status is that he is the youngest American elected to membership in the International Association of Procedural Law. Another is that he was invited to serve as National Reporter for the U.S. in connection… Continue reading

Rick Marcus on Public Courts in the United States

Published on: Author: Scott Dodson

My colleague Professor Rick Marcus, who has distinguished himself in procedure circles not just in the U.S. but also quite prominently abroad, has posted a new book chapter titled “Reassessing the Essential Role of the Public Courts: Learning from the American Experience.” The book is focused on the public role of courts from a comparative… Continue reading

Scott Dodson on Personal Jurisdiction and Aggregation

Published on: Author: Morris Ratner

In a new Northwestern University Law Review article titled “Personal Jurisdiction and Aggregation,” my colleague Scott Dodson unpacks how jurisdiction, preclusion, and joinder doctrines together enable aggregation, and highlights the increasing role played by personal-jurisdiction doctrine as a constraint.  This article is a welcome addition to the literature that highlights and ties together Professor Dodson’s… Continue reading

Scott Dodson on Jurisdiction in the Trump Era

Published on: Author: Rick Marcus

Scott Dodson is rightly regarded as “Mr. Jurisdiction” among American legal academics. He has written a spate of articles about many different jurisdictional issues that establish him as the leading authority of his generation on these subjects. In Jurisdiction in the Trump Era, a contribution to a symposium with Fordham Law Review, he draws on this expertise to… Continue reading

Scott Dodson on Reconceptualizing Jurisdiction

Published on: Author: Zach Price

My colleague Scott Dodson has established himself as one of the country’s leading civil procedure scholars by tackling some of the subject’s trickiest puzzles. In a recent article in the Georgetown Law Journal called “Jurisdiction and Its Effects,” Professor Dodson has done it again, training his sights on the vexed subject of jurisdiction. Professor Dodson… Continue reading

Morris Ratner on Unbundled Legal Services

Published on: Author: Scott Dodson

In a recent colloquium contribution titled “Restraining Lawyers: From ‘Cases’ to ‘Tasks’” published in Fordham Law Review, my colleague Morris Ratner, one of the most incisive voices on the intersection of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the actual business model of attorney litigation, dissects the traditional “case” as the unit of measure for… Continue reading

Rick Marcus on the Future of the American Class Action

Published on: Author: Scott Dodson

My colleague Rick Marcus, one of the current “greats” in the world of civil procedure, recently wrote a paper called “Bending in the Breeze: American Class Actions in the Twenty-First Century.” In the paper, Professor Marcus appraises the future of the federal class action.   Professor Marcus is in a good position to do so; he… Continue reading

Scott Dodson on Rules Committee Amicus Practice

Published on: Author: Zach Price

My colleague Scott Dodson, one of the country’s leading civil procedure scholars, has written a fascinating new article urging a litigation role for the rules committees that draft federal procedural rules. Professor Dodson’s article, “Should the Rules Committees Have an Amicus Role?,” appears in the Virginia Law Review. The article argues that the rules committees… Continue reading