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Kate Bloch on Using Virtual Reality to Prevent Brady Errors

Published on: Author: Hadar Aviram

Kate Bloch‘s article “Harnessing Virtual Reality to Prevent Prosecutorial Misconduct,” just published in the Georgetown Journal of Legal Ethics, seeks to provide a technological solution to reduce the serious problem of Brady errors (prosecutorial failure to disclose materially exculpatory evidence). Bloch’s point of departure is that prosecutorial mishandling of exculpatory evidence often stems from cognitive… Continue reading

Hadar Aviram on Adversarial Bias and the Criminal Process

Published on: Author: Aaron Rappaport

Malcolm Feeley is a widely respected—and, indeed, beloved—criminologist, who has had an extraordinary influence on the discipline as well as on the many scholars who came within his orbit. Cambridge has just published a collection of essays in his honor that highlights the extraordinary range and subtlety of his work. Titled “The Legal Process and… Continue reading

Aaron Rappaport on Police-Stop Violence

Published on: Author: Hadar Aviram

When Franklin Zimring decided to study lethal violence by police for his recent book When Police Kill, he learned that official records could not be trusted. As he explains in the book, data collected by the FBI (or by Vital Statistics) accounts for no more than half of the shootings reliably counted by The Guardian or The Washington Post.… Continue reading