Jaime King on California’s Drug Transparency Law

Published on: Author: Robin Feldman

When Governor Jerry Brown signed California’s drug transparency law, Senate Bill 17 (SB-17), in 2017, the state took a crucial first step towards increased transparency and accountability in a landscape of skyrocketing prescription-drug prices. Not only does SB-17 require drug manufacturers and health insurers to disclose information about rising prescription-drug prices, but it also represents… Continue reading

Naomi Roht-Arriaza on Foreign-Aid Protections

Published on: Author: David Takacs

The United States remains the world’s largest foreign-aid donor yet lacks a coordinated system of guidelines and protections to ensure that the aid does more good than harm. Professor Naomi Roht-Arriaza investigates this problem in “Safeguarding Development: Risk Reduction in U.S. Government Foreign Aid and Investment Facilitation Beyond the Current Patchwork,” a new paper published… Continue reading

Scott Dodson on Plaintiff Personal Jurisdiction and Venue Transfer

Published on: Author: Zach Price

As all lawyers remember fondly from civil procedure, personal jurisdiction under the modern “minimum contacts” approach protects defendants from being haled into remote forums with which they have no substantial connection. It normally has no significance for plaintiffs. Plaintiffs, after all, consent to litigation in the forum by bringing suit there. But is that always… Continue reading

Reuel Schiller on MLK and Economic Equality

Published on: Author: Jodi Short

In “Mourning King: The Civil Rights Movement and the Fight for Economic Justice,” recently published in the journal New Labor Forum, Reuel Schiller takes on the commonly espoused view that Martin Luther King’s assassination undermined the use of the Civil Rights Movement as a vehicle for broader efforts to combat multiracial economic equality. King was,… Continue reading

Hadar Aviram on the Parole System

Published on: Author: Eumi Lee

In her forthcoming book Yesterday’s Monsters (UC Press, Feb. 2020), my colleague Hadar Aviram examines the members of the Manson family and their journey through and impact on the criminal-justice system. Unlike other books about these infamous individuals, Professor Aviram uses the stories of Charles Manson and his followers as a starting point to study… Continue reading

Hadar Aviram on Adversarial Bias and the Criminal Process

Published on: Author: Aaron Rappaport

Malcolm Feeley is a widely respected—and, indeed, beloved—criminologist, who has had an extraordinary influence on the discipline as well as on the many scholars who came within his orbit. Cambridge has just published a collection of essays in his honor that highlights the extraordinary range and subtlety of his work. Titled “The Legal Process and… Continue reading

Jodi Short on Deregulation and “Regulatory Counting”

Published on: Author: Reuel Schiller

For the last 40 years, the desire to reduce the power of the regulatory state has been one of the central policy goals of the Republican Party. In some specific policy areas, this desire has been shared by Democratic politicians. Accordingly, starting in the 1970s numerous pieces of deregulatory legislation have been passed, for better… Continue reading

Jessica Vapnek on Packaged-Water Regulation

Published on: Author: Dave Owen

A few days ago, the New York Times ran an op-ed about the pervasive problems Pakistanis face accessing drinking water. Tap water is available in many places in Pakistan, but drinking it is a health risk; according to one recent report, forty percent of all deaths in Pakistan result from infectious diseases contracted by drinking… Continue reading

Aaron Rappaport on Police-Stop Violence

Published on: Author: Hadar Aviram

When Franklin Zimring decided to study lethal violence by police for his recent book When Police Kill, he learned that official records could not be trusted. As he explains in the book, data collected by the FBI (or by Vital Statistics) accounts for no more than half of the shootings reliably counted by The Guardian or The Washington Post.… Continue reading

Scott Dodson on Accountability and Transparency in U.S. Courts

Published on: Author: Rick Marcus

My colleague Scott Dodson is the most prominent American civil-procedure scholar of his generation addressing comparative-procedure issues. One recognition of his status is that he is the youngest American elected to membership in the International Association of Procedural Law. Another is that he was invited to serve as National Reporter for the U.S. in connection… Continue reading